Overview

In 1992, Peter and Rosemary Grant estimated that about one in ten bird species has hybridized with at least one other species. Since then that number has increased steadily as more and more avian hybrids were documented. This website does not attempt to give an overview of all the recorded hybrids (for this, see “Handbook of Avian Hybrids of the World” by Eugene McCarthy or this website).

Rather, my goal is to collect the scientific literature on avian hybridization in one place. For every bird order (and family in case of the Passeriformes), I have written short summaries. Click on the photos below to access the featured bird orders. In addition, the newest findings and publications will be presented in the Latest News section. For more information about the author and ways to contribute to this website, please have a look on the About page.

Accipitriformes (birds of prey)

Accipitriformes (birds of prey)

Swoose

Anseriformes (ducks, geese and swans)

Apodiformes (swifts and hummingbirds)

Apodiformes (swifts and hummingbirds)

Bucerotiformes (hornbills and wood hoopoes)

Bucerotiformes (hornbills and wood hoopoes)

Charadriiformes (waders, gulls and auks)

Charadriiformes (waders, gulls and auks)

Columbiformes (pigeons and doves)

Columbiformes (pigeons and doves)

Coraciiformes (kingfishers, motmots, etc.)

Coraciiformes (kingfishers, motmots, etc.)

Falconiformes (falcons)

Falconiformes (falcons)

Galliformes (gamebirds)

Galliformes (gamebirds)

Gaviiformes (divers)

Gaviiformes (divers)

Gruiformes (cranes and rails)

Gruiformes (cranes and rails)

Pelicaniformes (pelicans, cormorants, etc.)

Pelecaniformes (pelicans, cormorants, etc.)

Piciformes (woodpeckers)

Piciformes (woodpeckers)

Podicipediformes (grebes)

Podicipediformes (grebes)

Procellariiformes (albatrosses, shearwaters and petrels)

Procellariiformes (albatrosses, shearwaters and petrels)

Psittaciformes (parrots and parakeets)

Psittaciformes (parrots and parakeets)

Rheiformes (nandus)

Rheiformes (nandus)

Sphenisciformes (penguins)

Sphenisciformes (penguins)

Strigiformes (owls)

Strigiformes (owls)

Suliformes (gannets, boobies, cormorants)

Suliformes (gannets, boobies, cormorants)

Passeriformes (passerines)

Given the huge diversity of species and the relatively high incidence of hybridization among song birds, I decided to write separate summaries for particular passerine families. Click on the links below to read more about the featured bird families.

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